Mission

The mission of Rhode Island Mayoral Academies (RIMA) is to support the statewide growth of mayoral academies: high-performing, diverse, regional public schools governed by mayor-led school boards. RIMA works towards this mission by recruiting extraordinary school operators and leaders to open mayoral academies; supporting mayoral academies from the application stage through the first years of growth; and cultivating mayors across Rhode Island to become leaders in improving public education.

Our Schools

Blackstone Valley Prep Mayoral Academy

BVP an intentionally-diverse network of tuition-free public schools chartered by the Rhode Island Department of Education. As a growing network that is part of the Charter School Growth Fund portfolio, BVP offers a high quality public school choice to the families of Central Falls, Cumberland, Lincoln and Pawtucket and currently serves nearly 1,000 scholars in grades K-8. BVP's mission is to prepare every scholar for success in college and the world beyond.

BVP is home to a "commended" elementary school (only 9% of all schools in RI have earned this distinction from the Rhode Island Department of Education) and a "leading" middle school. Data from the New England Common Assessment Program shows dramatic results for scholars in both math and reading, on par with the best districts in the state.

Achievement First Providence Mayoral Academy

Achievement First Providence Mayoral Academy Elementary is the first Achievement First school in Rhode Island. It serves 180 kindergarten and first-grade students from Providence, Warwick, Cranston, and North Providence.

The mission of Achievement First is to close the achievement gap and deliver on the promise of equal educational opportunity for all children, regardless of race, economic status or zip code. With its college-prep focus, the Achievement First approach is attaining breakthrough academic gains throughout its network of 25 public charter schools. In the 2013-14 academic year, Achievement First is educating more than 8,100 students in historically low-performing and underserved neighborhoods in New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

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